WW2 Plane Name Inspiration

The names for our newest line of handguards were inspired by World War II planes used by Allied Forces. We cannot emphasize enough how much respect we have for our armed forces and what they have accomplished for us. We wanted to pay tribute to past heroes as we help affordably arm our fellow US citizens. See a list below with a few details about each plane that inspired a name for our new handguard lineup.

 

  • Sptfr - Supermarine Spitfire

    • SKUs: BRK1111-BRK1120

    • The Supermarine Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft used by the Royal Air Force and other Allied countries before, during, and after World War II. The Spitfire was designed as a short-range, high-performance interceptor aircraft. The Spitfire was used before the Battle of Britain (July-Oct 1940), but after their better performance during the battle than the other RAF fighter planes it became the backbone of RAF Fighter Command going forward. Much loved by its pilots, the Spitfire served in several roles, including interceptor, photo-reconnaissance, fighter-bomber, and trainer, and it continued to serve in these roles until the 1950s.

    • Maximum speed: 370 mph (322 kn, 595 km/h)

    • Combat radius: 410 nmi (470 mi (756 km))

    • Service ceiling: 36,500 ft (11,125 m)

 

  • Shdwr - Airspeed AS.39 Fleet Shadower

    • SKUs: BRK1121-BRK1126

    • The Airspeed AS.39 Fleet Shadower was a British long-range patrol aircraft design. The Royal Navy wanted an aircraft that could shadow enemy fleets at night; this called for a slow-flying low-noise aircraft with a long range, capable of operating from an aircraft carrier's flight deck. The Shadower did not see much action in the war due to advancements in airborne radar.

    • Maximum speed: 126 mph (110 knots, 203 km/h) at 5,000 ft (1,500 m)

    • Service ceiling: 14,700 ft [5] (4,480 m)

    • Endurance: 6 hours

 

  • Wrhwk - Curtiss P-40 Warhawk

    • SKUs: BRK1127-BRK1131

    • The Curtiss P-40 Warhawk is an American single-engined, single-seat, all-metal fighter and ground-attack aircraft that first flew in 1938. The Warhawk was used by most Allied powers during World War II, and remained in frontline service until the end of the war. It was the third most-produced American fighter of World War II, after the P-51 and P-47. It served mainly as an air superiority fighter, bomber escort and fighter-bomber. Based on war-time victory claims, over 200 Allied fighter pilots from 7 different nations (England, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa, the United States, and the Soviet Union) became aces flying the P-40, with at least 20 double aces.

    • Maximum speed: 360 mph (310 kn, 580 km/h)

    • Range: 650 mi (560 nmi, 1,100 km)

    • Service ceiling: 29,000 ft (8,800 m)

 

  • Wrwik - Vickers Warwick

    • SKUs: BRK1132-BRK1136

    • The Vickers Warwick was a multi-purpose twin-engined British aircraft developed and operated in WWII. The Warwick was the largest British twin-engined aircraft to see use during the Second World War. It was developed as a heavy bomber, but due to other competition with other aircraft designs most were for transport, air-sea rescue, and maritime reconnaissance.

    • Maximum speed: 224 mph (195 knots, 361 km/h)

    • Range: 2,300 miles (2,000 NM, 3,700 km)

    • Service ceiling: 21,500 ft (6,550 m)

 

  • Tmpst - Hawker Tempest

    • SKUs: BRK1137-BRK1141

    • The Hawker Tempest is a British fighter aircraft primarily used by the Royal Air Force in WWII. The Tempest emerged as one of the most powerful fighters of World War II and was the fastest single-engine propeller-driven aircraft of the war at low altitude. Upon entering service in 1944, the Tempest was used as a low-level interceptor, particularly against the V-1 flying bomb threat, and as a ground attack platform. Later, it successfully targeted the rail infrastructure in Germany and Luftwaffe aircraft on the ground, as well as countering such attacks by German fighters. The Tempest was effective in the low-level interception role, including against newly developed jet-propelled aircraft

    • Maximum speed: 432 mph (695 km/h) Sabre IIA at 18,400 ft (5,608 m), Sabre IIB 435 mph at 19,000 ft (700 km/h at 5,791 m)

    • Range: 740 mi (1,190 km) [1,530 mi with 90 gal drop tanks]

    • Service ceiling: 36,500 ft (11,125 m)

 

  • Sewlf - Consolidated TBY Sea Wolf

    • SKUs: BRK1142-BRK1146

    • The Consolidated TBY Sea Wolf was a United States Navy torpedo bomber of World War II. The first prototype flew two weeks after Pearl Harbor and its performance was deemed superior to the current counterpart: the Avenger. The Sea Wolf  was radar-equipped, with a radome under the right-hand wing. The first aircraft flew on 20 August 1944, but due to some production delays and competing contracts with the Navy this plane missed the war action, so the planes that were built were mostly used for training.

    • Maximum speed: 306 mph (492 km/h)

    • Range: 1,500 mi (2,414 km)

    • Service ceiling: 27,200 ft (8,290 m)

 

  • Sefox - Fairey Seafox

    • SKUs: BRK1147-BRK1151

    • The Fairey Seafox was a 1930s British reconnaissance floatplane that was designed to be catapulted from the deck of a light cruiser and served in the Second World War. It was powered by a 16-cylinder 395 hp air-cooled Napier Rapier H engine. It cruised at 106 mph, and had a range of 440 mi (710 km). They remained in service until 1943.

    • Maximum speed: 124 mph (108 knots, 200 km/h) at 5,860 ft (1,787 m)

    • Range: 440 mi (383 nmi, 710 km)

    • Service ceiling: 9,700 ft (2,960 m)

 

  • Tgrmth - de Havilland Tiger Moth

    • SKUs: BRK1152-BRK1156

    • The de Havilland DH.82 Tiger Moth is a 1930s biplane designed by Geoffrey de Havilland. It was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) and many other operators as a primary trainer aircraft. In addition to training, the Second World War saw RAF Tiger Moths operating in other capacities, including maritime surveillance and defensive anti-invasion preparations; some aircraft were even outfitted to function as armed light bombers. The Tiger Moth remained in service with the RAF until it was succeeded and replaced by the de Havilland Chipmunk during the early 1950s.

    • Maximum speed: 109 mph at 1,000 ft (97 kn, 175 km/h at 300 m)

    • Range: 302 miles (250 nm, 486 km)

    • Service ceiling: 13,600 ft (4,145 m)

 

  • Flcn - Curtiss-Wright CW-22 (SNC-1 Falcon)

    • SKUs: BRK1157-BRK1161

    • The Curtiss-Wright CW-22 was a 1940s American general-purpose advanced training monoplane aircraft. It was operated by the United States Navy as a scout trainer with the designation SNC-1 Falcon. The Falcon was deemed suitable as a combat trainer, reconnaissance and general-purpose aircraft for military use. It was also exported to several Allied countries to see more direct action in the War.

    • Maximum speed: 198 mph (319 km/h)

    • Range: 780 miles (1,255 km)

    • Service ceiling: 21,800 ft (6,645 m)

 

  • Phntm - McDonnell FH Phantom

    • SKUs: BRK1162-BRK1166

    • The McDonnell FH Phantom was a twinjet fighter aircraft designed and first flown during World War II for the United States Navy. The Phantom was the first purely jet-powered aircraft to land on an American aircraft carrier and the first jet deployed by the United States Marine Corps. Although at the end of the war only 62 FH-1s were built, it helped prove the viability of carrier-based jet fighters going forward. The Phantom’s success led to the development of the follow-on F2H Banshee, which was one of the two most important naval jet fighters of the Korean War.

    • Maximum speed: 417 knots (479 mph, 771 km/h) at sea level

    • Range: 604 nmi (695 mi, 1,120 km)

    • Service ceiling: 41,100 ft (12,525 m)

 

  • Rngr - Boeing XPBB-1 Sea Ranger

    • SKUs: BRK1167

    • The Sea Ranger was designed to be patrol bomber that could cover the huge Pacific Ocean, and design started before the US entered WWII. The plane had to be fairly large in order to cover the desired distances, and grew to have a wingspan of 139 feet 8-1/2 inches and required a crew of 10. It was able to be powered by only 2 engines, making it the largest twin-engined flying boat flown during WWII. Offensive armament could consist of up to 20,000 lb of bombs in internal bomb bays in the wing center section (five bays on each side) or of two Mk.13 or Mk.15 torpedoes slung under the wing center section. Due to the need for Boeing's B-29 bombers, the contract for the Sea Rangers was cancelled, even though the prototype plane handled very well and was considered technically successful, making the prototype the 'Lone Ranger'.

    • Maximum speed: 186 knots (214 mph, 345 km/h) at sea level

    • Range (max): 6,300 mi (5,500 nmi, 10,000 km)

    • Service ceiling: 22,400 ft (6,830 m)